The Deadly Dangers of Stress

The Deadly Dangers of Stress

We are more under stress today than we have ever been and unfortunately repeated stress can kill you. When you are stressed, the hormone cortisol is produced by the body. Cortisol is designed to make you operate at “higher than peak” efficiency is as part of the fight or flight mechanism. When in need, the hormone is produced; the body reacts to move out of that situation, after which the production of cortisol ceases. Cortisol is only meant to be released in small quantities at a time at specific instances. However, when we are under stress, cortisol is released for longer periods of time, which can have dangerous consequences for long-term health.

For most of us, stress is just part of life and is something that we just have to live with. However we do not realize what this sustained amount of stress can do to the body and how it can lead to serious illness such as diabetes. Diabetes occurs when insulin in the body is no longer able to process sugars that are ingested. After a while, as sugar levels rise, the danger imposed on the sufferer becomes more and more serious, often leading to coma and even death. For many diabetes sufferers, carrying around a supply of insulin is essential to keep the sugar at manageable levels.

Probably the most common consequence of stress is high blood pressure. People who suffer from high blood pressure over a sustained period of time are at serious risk of heart failure. The valves contained in the heart operate a particular pressure. When blood pressure is too high for sustained periods, these valves become damaged and can only be repaired by surgery when the damage has been detected. Unfortunately for many unlucky victims, the damage to the valves is not detected until the person has experienced a heart attack.

The biggest reason for stress today, is the ever-increasing speed at which we live our lives. This stress is set to continue as more and more demands are placed on us and the only way to survive this, is if we learn to manage our stress in such a way that it does not impact on our health in any substantial way. But before we can do this, we need to understand how stress impacts on the body, the chemical reactions that take place, and the serious consequences for our long-term health.

To fully comprehend stress and how it impacts on us, we need to understand how stress is linked to toxicity, and how toxins can make you sick. If we can understand this relationship, then we should be able to manage our stress levels much more effectively, thereby substantially lowering the risks of developing chronic disease. Life is not going to slow down, but if we can arm ourselves with the right tools to deal with the stresses, then we should be able to live healthier and happier lives. If we understand the impact of stress on our lives, then we have already won half the battle.

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